Le Siège de Paris (French Edition)

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This prompted the city's surrender on 28 January Paris sustained more damage in the — siege than in any other conflict.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Secret armistice discussions began on January 23, and continued at Versailles between Jules Favre and Bismarck until the 27th. On the French side there was concern that the National Guard would rebel when news of the capitulation became public. Bismarck's advice was "provoke an uprising, then, while you still have an army with which to suppress it".

The final terms agreed on were that the French regular troops less one division would be disarmed, Paris would pay an indemnity of two hundred million francs, and the fortifications around the perimeter of the city would be surrendered. In return the armistice was extended until February Food supplies from the provinces, as well as shiploads from Britain and the United States, began to enter the starving city almost immediately. The German troops departed after two days, to take up temporary encampments to the east of the city; to be withdrawn from there as well as soon as France paid the agreed war indemnity.

While Parisians scrubbed the streets "polluted" by the triumphal entry no serious incidents occurred during the short and symbolic occupation of the city. This was in part because the Germans had avoided entry into areas such as Belleville , where hostility was reportedly high.

Franco-Prussian War: Siege of Paris

Balloon mail was the only means by which communications from the besieged city could reach the rest of France. The use of balloons to carry mail was first proposed by the photographer and balloonist Felix Nadar , who had established the grandiosely titled No. Around 66 balloon flights were made, including one that accidentally set a world distance record by ending up in Norway.

The number of letters carried has been estimated at around 2. The balloons also carried homing pigeons out of Paris to be used for a pigeon post. This was the only means by which communications from the rest of France could reach the besieged city. A specially laid telegraph cable on the bed of the Seine had been discovered and cut by the Prussians on 27 September, [21] couriers attempting to make their way through the German lines were almost all intercepted and although other methods were tried including attempts to use balloons, dogs and message canisters floated down the Seine, these were all unsuccessful.

The pigeons were taken to their base, first at Tours and later at Poitiers , and when they had been fed and rested were ready for the return journey. Before release, they were loaded with their dispatches. Initially the pigeon post was only used for official communications but on 4 November the government announced that members of the public could send messages, these being limited to twenty words at a charge of 50 centimes per word.


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These were then copied onto sheets of cardboard and photographed by a M. Barreswille, a photographer based in Tours. The photographic process allowed multiple copies of the messages to be sent, so that although only 57 of the pigeons released reached Paris more than 60, of the 95, messages sent were delivered.


  • Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life under Siege (), Clayson.
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  • The preliminary peace treaty was signed at Versailles, and the final peace treaty, the Treaty of Frankfurt , was signed on 10 May The continued presence of German troops outside the city angered Parisians. Further resentment arose against the French government, and in March Parisian workers and members of the National Guard rebelled and established the Paris Commune , a radical and socialist government, which lasted through late May of that year.


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    Empires of Sand by David W. Ball Bantam Dell , is a novel in two parts, the first of which is set during the Franco-Prussian war, more particularly the Siege of Paris during the winter of Key elements of the Siege, including the hot-air balloons used for reconnaissance and messages, the tunnels beneath the city, the starvation and the cold, combine to render a vivid impression of war-time Paris before its surrender.

    The latter runs away to make a disastrous marriage in France, where after being abandoned by her husband, she lives through the siege of Paris and the Commune. Elusive Liberty is a novel by Glen Davies. It follows the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty, Major Auguste Bartholdi , who fought against the German invaders as an aide-de-camp to General Garibaldi and is in Paris during the Siege.

    The King in Yellow , a short story collection by Robert W.

    Paris Commune

    Chambers , published in , includes a story titled "The Street of the First Shell" which takes place over a few days of the Siege. Henty , also published in , spans the Prussian Siege and the ensuing events of the Paris Commune. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Siege during the Franco-Prussian War. For other sieges with this name, see Siege of Paris. Franco-Prussian War — Siege of Paris. Franco-Prussian War. Interested in participating in the Publishing Partner Program?

    Let us know. Siege of Paris , November 25, —October , nearly year-long Viking siege of Paris , at the time the capital of the kingdom of the West Franks, notable as the first occasion on which the Vikings dug themselves in for a long siege rather than conduct a hit-and-run raid or fight a battle. Their failure to capture the city marked a turning point in French history.

    The Vikings first rowed up the Seine to attack Paris in and returned three times in the s. Each time they looted the city or were bought off with bribes.

    The American University of Paris | International Undergraduate and Graduate Programs.

    The island city was recently fortified, but the Frankish kingdom was weak and unable to defend itself properly. Taking advantage of this weakness, the Vikings attacked Paris again with a large fleet on November 25, Duke Odo of Francia, who controlled the city, prepared for the attack by erecting two towers to guard each bridge.

    His own force was small, probably numbering no more than men, but they repulsed each Viking assault on the towers with a burning, sticky mixture of hot wax and pitch. The Viking request for tribute refused, the Vikings besieged the city, attacking the northeast tower with catapults, battering rams, and other war machines.

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    They set alight three ships to burn down the wooden bridge, weakening it enough for it to be swept away by heavy rains in February The tower was eventually captured, but by then the Vikings had moved on to pillage the surrounding countryside. The Parisians took the chance to replenish their supplies and seek help from outside. Articles such as this one were acquired and published with the primary aim of expanding the information on Britannica.

    Although these articles may currently differ in style from others on the site, they allow us to provide wider coverage of topics sought by our readers, through a diverse range of trusted voices. These articles have not yet undergone the rigorous in-house editing or fact-checking and styling process to which most Britannica articles are customarily subjected. Questions or concerns?

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    Vikings: The Siege of Paris (Part 3) [Season 3 Battle Scene] 3x08 (HD 1080p)

    Siege of Paris , November 25, —October , nearly year-long Viking siege of Paris , at the time the capital of the kingdom of the West Franks, notable as the first occasion on which the Vikings dug themselves in for a long siege rather than conduct a hit-and-run raid or fight a battle.

    Their failure to capture the city marked a turning point in French history. The Vikings first rowed up the Seine to attack Paris in and returned three times in the s.

    Each time they looted the city or were bought off with bribes. The island city was recently fortified, but the Frankish kingdom was weak and unable to defend itself properly. Taking advantage of this weakness, the Vikings attacked Paris again with a large fleet on November 25, Duke Odo of Francia, who controlled the city, prepared for the attack by erecting two towers to guard each bridge.

    His own force was small, probably numbering no more than men, but they repulsed each Viking assault on the towers with a burning, sticky mixture of hot wax and pitch. The Viking request for tribute refused, the Vikings besieged the city, attacking the northeast tower with catapults, battering rams, and other war machines.

    They set alight three ships to burn down the wooden bridge, weakening it enough for it to be swept away by heavy rains in February The tower was eventually captured, but by then the Vikings had moved on to pillage the surrounding countryside. The Parisians took the chance to replenish their supplies and seek help from outside. During the summer, the Vikings made a final attempt to take the city, but they were soon surrounded by a Frankish army led by Charles the Fat. Rather than fight, he paid the Vikings pounds of silver to lift the siege and sent them off to ravage Burgundy , then in revolt against Frankish rule.

    Indignant over the defeat and ransom, Parisians refused to allow the Vikings to pass on the river on their way back, forcing them to drag their boats thousands of feet over land to an area of the river outside of town. We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles.

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